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Have you decided you want/ need coach mentoring for credentialing?

12241284_463487123852750_3596616356585400469_nHow to choose a coach mentor?

The ICF defines Mentor Coaching as providing professional assistance in achieving and demonstrating the levels of coaching competency demanded by the desired credential level sought by a coach?applicant (mentee). Furthermore, Mentor Coaching means an applicant (mentee) being coached on their coaching skills rather than coaching on practice building, life balance, or other topics unrelated to the development of an applicant’s coaching skill.

Personal Traits

The ICF Mentor Coach:
  1. Is trustworthy and has the ability to connect with the mentee in terms of fit, chemistry and compatibility.
  2. Is someone who encourages the mentee to reach beyond what the mentee initially feels is possible, assisting in broadening their creative process.
  3.  Demonstrates equal partnership by being open, vulnerable and willing to take appropriate risks, for example, in providing feedback that may make one or both individuals uncomfortable.
  4. Understands and is able to model the value of partnership and, as an example, allows/encourages the mentee to lead in designing areas to be worked on between sessions that will lead to more powerful, leveraged coaching.
  5. Has the ability to be supportive and authentic in celebrating who the mentee is, her/his achievements and growth throughout the process.
  6. Is secure in their own work and is able to demonstrate appreciation and respect for the unique style of each mentee.
  7. Encourages the development of the mentee’s own coaching style
  8. Is willing to hold both self and mentee accountable for performance and to periodically encourage mutual assessment of the effectiveness of the relationship
Your Executive Coaching Professionals Mentor Coach John Sharp has been a professional coach for 12 years, a member of the ICF for 8, a Professional Certified Coach for 4 and is a member of the Professional Standards Committee of the International Coach Federation of Australasia (ICFA).
  • He has served on the ICFA and ICF Global Coach Supervision task force for 18 months developing a set of Competencies for Coach Supervisors and is currently serving on the ICF Global Coach Mentoring task force to refine the advertised International Coach Federation Competencies for Coach Mentors.
  • He is also Credentialing Lead for ICF Western Australia so is ideally placed to support you through mentoring in your quest for Coaching Excellence
  • He is registered on the International Coach Federation Mentor Coach Registry and is able to demonstrate the Competencies and display the Personal Traits required by the International Coach Federation as he performs his duties in conducting both group and individual mentoring.
  • He provides coach mentoring designed to support coaches in attaining credentials as well as simply for continuing professional development.

Are you an ICF Credential coach considering renewing?

Fork sign.pptxWhen the time arrives to renew your credential there are at least two considerations that should play into the decision

DO I RENEW OR DO I UPGRADE

  RENEW
You will need to have participated in at least 40 hours of Continuing Coach Education (CCE) in the three years since the initial award of your credential or since your last credential renewal, with at least 24 hours in Core Competencies.
  CCEUs are divided into two categories
  • Core Competencies: Advanced coach training, writing, or research directly related to ICF Core Competencies.
  • Resource Development: Training, writing, research, or self-study outside of the ICF Core Competencies that contributes to the professional development of a coach.
  OR UPGRADE
You will need to have logged to more than 750 hours (675 paid) of coaching experience with at least 25 clients in total

OR

more than 500 hours (450 paid) of coaching experience with at least 25 clients following the start of your coach-specific training. At least 50 of these hours must occur within the 18 months prior to submitting the application for the credential

Register Now

The Executive Coaching Professionals ICF Accredited Group Coach Mentoring Program includes:
  • 7 Approved Group Coach Mentoring Hours +
  • 3 Approved Individual Coach Mentoring Hours (for Credentialing Purposes)
OR
  • 11.75hrs of Core Competencies and 4hrs of Resource Development Competencies Continuing Coaching Education Units (CCEUs) as approved by the International Coach Federation (ICF
+         All of the of benefits and tools outlined on our How do we conduct Coach Mentoring Web Page
  • PAYPAL INSTALLMENT PLAN
  • 10 Hour Group Mentoring Package: AUD1,800 (Instalment plan) 3 automatic 10 weekly payments of AUD600
  • Group Mentoring Instalment Plan
Group Mentoring Installment Plan
Number of payments 3
No. Due* Amount
1 At checkout $600.00 AUD
2 after 10 weeks $600.00 AUD
3 after 20 weeks $600.00 AUD
Total $1,800.00 AUD
* We calculate payments from the date of checkout.
  + 10% G.S.T. applicable in Australia
Sign up for

  • PAYPAL DISCOUNT PLAN
  • 10 Hour Group Mentoring Package: AUD1,550 (Pay once and save 14%) Onetime payment of AUD1550
  • Group Mentoring Discount Plan
 + 10% G.S.T. applicable in Australia
       Sign up for

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Or direct Credit to Westpac Bank

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SWIFT Code WPACAU2S

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Reference ‘your name’

Who will be your coach mentor?

john_sharp_passportYOUR MENTOR John Sharp

John has been a professional coach for 12 years, a member of the ICF for 8, a Professional Certified Coach for 4 and is a member of the Professional Standards Committee of the International Coach Federation of Australasia (ICFA).   He has served on the ICFA & later ICF Global Coach Supervision task force for 2 years developing a set of Competencies for Coach Supervisors and is currently serving on the ICFA/ICFUK  now ICF Global Coach Mentoring task force to refine the advertised International Coach Federation Competencies for Coach Mentors.
 
He is also Credentialing Lead for ICF Western Australia so is ideally placed to support you through mentoring in your quest for Coaching Excellence He is registered on the International Coach Federation Mentor Coach Registry and is able to demonstrate the Competencies and display the Personal Traits required by the International Coach Federation as he performs his duties in conducting both group and individual mentoring. He provides coach mentoring designed to support coaches in attaining credentials as well as simply for continuing professional development. These can be delivered one on one, in group sessions and as a combination of both
DISCLAIMER: Just because John is Credentialing Lead for ICF Western Australia and a member of  the ICF Global Coach Mentoring task force, we cannot guarantee that as a result of his coach mentoring you will definitely attain the ICF credential you are seeking.

What stage are you at in your quest for coaching Mastery

transformation Do you want to apply for your first ICF credential, renew your existing credential, apply for a higher level of credential or just want to grow your coaching skills & competence? Executive Coaching Professionals COACH MENTORING PROGRAM can help you achieve these aims. “To become a master at any skill, it takes the total effort of your: heart, mind, and soul working together in tandem.” ? Maurice Young

2016 DATES NOW AVAILABLE – Registrations for program 1/2016 close 1st March

https://www.executivecoachingprofessionals.com/coach-mentoring/registrations-sample/

What’s similar in Coaching to Christmas?

Christmas 5At Christmas we give Presents to our loved ones

In Coaching we give Presence to our clients

At Christmas we send messages to connect with others

In Coaching we get messages to connect with our self

At Christmas we celebrate the oneness of all – In Coaching we celebrate the wholeness of one

At Christmas we often reflect on past memories – In Coaching we often reflect on future opportunities

At Christmas we give the Gift of Love – In Coaching we Love the Gift of Giving

 
Wishing you all a healthy & happy Christmas and a deeply rewarding 2016

Wishing you all a healthy & happy Christmas and a deeply rewarding 2016

from the Executive Coaching Professionals’ team

WHY YOU NEED AN INTERNATIONAL COACH FEDERATION CREDENTIAL

12241284_463487123852750_3596616356585400469_nAnyone serious about building or maintaining a coaching business should pursue an ICF Credential and become part of this well-respected group that has chosen to regulate itself and provide accountability to clients and the coaching profession as a whole. Coach Mentoring is an important requirement of the ICF Credentialing process and is vital to the development and growth of the individual seeking an ICF Credential. Visit Executive Coaching Professionals to find out more https://www.executivecoachingprofessionals.com/coach-mentoring/why-coach-mentoring/  

DON’T LEAVE IT TOO LATE

Do something today that your future self_willIf your International Coach Federation Credential expires 31 December 2016 you would be wise to start planning your renewal NOW. You need to ensure that you have participated in at least 40 hours of Continuing Coach Education (CCE) in the three years since the initial award of your credential or since your last credential renewal, with at least 24 hours in Core Competencies. For ACC renewals only, an additional 10 hours of Mentor Coaching above those hours required for initial credential, completed in the three years since the initial award of your credential or since your last credential renewal.  
Executive Coaching Professionals provides ICF Accredited Group Coach Mentoring Sessions throughout the year. You can elect to join one of these that suits your needs and availability

The King’s Speech: A Coaching Story Worthy of An Oscar

ChessGeoffrey Rush (as Lionel Logue, a speech therapist) coaches Colin Firth (as King George VI) through a severe speech impediment. In dark days, as the world slides toward war, the country needs a king who can inspire confidence. The stakes are high.

As King George’s voice therapist, Lionel addresses the whole person in working with a deeply rooted pattern that traditional approaches had not been able to touch. Lionel is wholly unorthodox, in a very orthodox culture. As coach, he demonstrates many of the International Coach Federation Core Competencies:
3. Creating trust and intimacy
  • expresses support for the client by taking a stand for possibility, consistently believing and showing confidence that the king can learn to speak clearly and smoothly. A coach holds the belief in the client’s potential, even when the client doesn’t yet see the possibility.
4. Coaching presence
  • encouraging and allowing the client to fully express him/herself by insisting on an authentic relationship, not taking the role (even of the King!) seriously, and constantly speaking to the authentic person within. Lionel speaks to the human, even calling His Royal Highness “Bertie.” Our roles in life provide a sense of identity that keep us safe and our world predictable, and that reinforce habits. Increased identification with a role often makes it harder to change; a coach challenges limiting assumptions associated with role in order to liberate a greater range of actions and behaviours.
6. Powerful questions
  • questions use the client’s language and elements of the client’s learning style and frame of reference by engaging George’s body, working somatically by asking him to roll around on the floor, shake himself loose, and break his patterns of embodiment. Our habits are wired in our bodies: playing, singing, dancing, and changing rigidly held body shapes will nearly always reveal new possibilities.
7. Direct communication
  • shares observations, intuitions, comments, thoughts and feelings to serve the client’s learning or forward movement by recognizing, and letting go of, his own ego’s attachment to working with such a famous client. When he first heard who the prospective client was, we see him briefly respond to this pull. And, momentarily, he regroups and returns to his conditions for success, insisting that even the Duke of York must come to his studio for help.
8. Creating awareness
  • shares what s/he is noticing about the client and /or the client’s situation, and seeks the client’s input or exploration by impelling him into self-observation. Lionel confronts George with evidence that his stammering isn’t as unconquerable as he always thought. The recording of himself eloquently reading Shakespeare astonishes him, as do moments of articulateness when Lionel goads him to anger. Moments of realization open the possibility of more substantive and permanent change, and build his trust and commitment to the process. When we find cracks in the monoliths of our stories, we are able to see, and expand, the exceptions to build something new.
9. Designing actions
  • assists the client to design what actions/thinking client will do after the session in order for the client to continue moving toward the client’s desired outcomes by insisting that George practice new habits and new ways of doing things. The eccentric Lionel simply knows from experience what works, and insists that the King do his homework.
11. Managing progress & accountability
  • invites or allows client to consider her/his path forward, including, as appropriate, support mechanisms, resources and potential barriers by making strong requests to establish conditions for success. For example, the work will only be successful if it’s in Lionel’s workspace, and on a daily basis. The coach must insist that coaching be done in a way that can be successful. If the process is watered down in order to accommodate clients’ short term needs, they may not end up with the clients’ desired results. Everyone loses.
There’s much to be seen here. If you saw the movie already, see it again with these distinctions in mind. If not, make it a priority. This is somatic, whole person coaching, done before the term was invented.
  • What experiments could you try in your coaching, using distinctions from this film?
  • How might you be a bolder stand for your clients?
  • Where are you reluctant to make strong requests of your clients around conditions important for the success of coaching?
What other coaching elements or principles did you see Lionel doing that we can learn from? Based on an ICF blog by Doug Silsbee 14 Feb 2011

NEW YEARS RESOLUTIONS

Goal-Setting-Button_Page_01Making an important resolution this year? Often we see processes that reflect the diagram and they are important.  

However sometimes insufficient emphasis is placed on the first step which is setting the goal. For goal setting to be effective it needs to be done in a way that connects with all of our being.  Thinking about what we want and analysing that is valuable AND we need to feel it emotionally & spiritually as well.

If we can connect our resolutions with something that is truly important to our being, achieving it becomes relatively effortless.


Picture1

Robert Diltz – Neurological Levels

Have you ever felt completely congruent about something?  Having your behaviours, beliefs, and identity all fully aligned feels great, doesn’t it? How about the other way around? Have you ever felt incongruent about something, but in a way that you can’t quite pinpoint? Is it sometimes like you are doing all the right things, but not moving anywhere? Or maybe you know what to do, but you just can’t get yourself to do it.

So getting clarity about your goal and connecting it with your identity is the most powerful way I know of making resolutions happen

A couple of year ago I had allowed myself to become significantly overweight, showing signs of classic middle age spread. At the same time I was sharing with friends my aspiration to still be Scuba Diving on my 100th birthday, by inviting them to join me for the party.

A conversation with my Doctor brought to my attention the mismatch between my (then) current state – she advised me that my excessive weight was my greatest risk factor for achieving the longevity to which I aspired – and the achievement of that aspiration.

Well I haven’t gone Scuba Diving on my 100th birthday yet, still got quite a few years to go for that, but I have lost 25kg and I did it in 8 months with relatively little effort. Other that frequently reminding myself of the end goal.

I had changed my BEHAVIOUR (diet & exercise) with relatively little effort by BELIEVING I was CAPABLE and focussing on my IDENTITY (a mentally & physically healthy being capable of still Scuba Diving at 100 years of age.)


Here are some further ideas that may support you to keep your resolutions and reach your goals:

 Goal Clarity:

Knowing what you want, why you want it, and what you need to do to succeed is essential for sustained effort. Knowing how that connects with your IDENTITY is critical

“The reason most people never reach their goals is that they don’t define them, or ever seriously consider them as believable or achievable. Winners can tell you where they are going, what they plan to do along the way, and who will be sharing the adventure with them.” —Denis Waitley

Ask yourself:
  1. What do I want?
  • Be specific,
  • make sure it is phrased positively, and
  • the outcome is within your control to achieve
2. What will it be like
  • What will I accept as evidence that I have achieved my outcome?
  • What will I see, hear, feel, smell and /or taste
3. For what purpose do I want this
  • what will it bring me?
  • How will it serve me?
4. Ecology
  • Are the costs and consequences of obtaining this outcome acceptable?
  • What are the resources & effort required
5. Context
  • When, where and with whom do I want this
6. Resources
  • What internal resources do I have and what do I need to achieve my outcome?
7. Will
  • If I could have it now, would I take it?
8. Actions
  • What are the first three actions steps I need to take to make this happen?
9. Future pace
  • Imagine a future scenario where I could apply these desired outcomes and test whether they would work in that situation.
“The whole secret of a successful life is to find out what is one’s destiny to do, and then do it.” —Henry Ford

Belief:

Ask yourself on a scale of 1 – 10, “how much do I believe this is possible?” If your answer is below 10 , then ask your self “what do I need to do or be differently so that it is 10?” It may mean altering your goal or redefining what it is that you really want. Even if you have no idea HOW it is going to happen, you must believe that it CAN happen.
“To accomplish great things, we must not only act, but also dream, not only plan, but also believe.” —Anatole France

Patience:

We don’t always achieve our goals at first attempt and it can take longer that we had envisaged
“Success is walking from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm.” —Winston Churchill

Courage:

Courage to go one hour longer than you ever thought you could in abstaining from something you desire, courage to be vulnerable, to take risks, to be unpopular, courage comes in many forms. Having courage, while also having patience, is even more challenging. Yet, the two must go together.
“Only put off until tomorrow what you are willing to die having left undone.” —Pablo Picasso

Forgiveness:

An ancient proverb teaches “Seven times I may fall, but eight times I will rise again.” Falling is not failure.  It is an important part of any challenging process. What we do when we fall is what matters. When you fall choose to pick yourself up compassionately. Acknowledge yourself for your efforts and for being human. Be gentle. Take the time to make observations on what caused the fall. Use this knowledge to make new decisions to become stronger and more capable as you rise.
“I have not failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.” —Thomas A. Edison

Presence:

Being focused on where we want to end up makes it difficult to be present along the way.  We forget how important it is to be grounded in where we are. Presence is essential to success because it allows us to be aware of what is happening and how it is aligned with our goal. As we have been told many times, it isn’t so much the destination but the journey that is the prize. Neglecting to engage in the process cheats you out of the fulfilment of being a part of your own amazing journey.
Without the presence of the Spirit, it is impossible to comprehend our personal mission or to have the reassurance that our course is right.” —Sheri L. Dew

Compassion:

The BEST part of digging deep to reach a goal is the way your heart opens up to others through the experience. Whether their paths are similar to yours or not, you know the strength it takes to simply be human. This creates connections between yourself and all of humanity. As your proclivity toward compassion grows, the ways that you are able to enjoy the world around you multiplies exponentially.
“Success is … knowing your purpose in life, growing to reach your maximum potential, and sowing seeds that benefit others.” —John C. Maxwell

Based on an International Coach Federation Blog by Regina Hellinger 18 Jan 2013

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